January – February 2017

Back to Work

There was a TV programme some years ago about people who did things at the weekend. Lying in bed all morning and extended breakfasts did not figure in the study. Strenuous, dangerous and competitive sports did. Sports people were interviewed. The purpose of the study – amongst other things – was to determine the efficiency of these people the day after their weekend competitions; i.e. what kind of Monday they had when back in the real world. Psychologists, doctors and various experts were called in and the sporting heroes were studied. It was found that our sporting warriors packed so much into their weekend that they effectively sacrificed much of their first day back at work to staring into space.

Some blog readers will have strenuous weekend sports and activities, or maybe drive competition cars. They suffer from (what shall we call it….?) I know, RDS (Recuperating Day Syndrome). In effect, their first day back at work becomes their day off, but instead of lying in bed they must go to work. They are tired, anti-climaxed and their work performance is unproductive and generally below par. Apart from spending the day staring into space, there is the weekend’s story to tell. This helps to overcome the deflation of going back to work. The story has to be told countless times of course. Work colleagues have to hear, and overhear, it many times. Then there are the phone calls – the same story about their feats of derring-do. For those with CCS (Compulsive Communication Syndrome), the telephone will be in use much of the day.

The study is not bad news for the employer as the experts on TV found that weekend-competitive-people are more efficient than their conventional colleagues if a whole week’s work were to be studied.

“Sports serve society by providing vivid examples of excellence. “

George F. Will

US editor, commentator, & columnist (1941 – )